WORLD WAR I
Navy collier, Cyclops

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Record 502/678
Copyright Oshkosh Public Museum
Image
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Collection Albert George Ahrens
Copyright Oshkosh Public Museum
Description Gelatin print of Navy collier, Cyclops.
Year Range from 1916
Event World War I
Year range to 1918
Notes Outdoor view of the Navy collier, Cyclops with inset of Albert George Ahrens. The Cyclops was built in 1910 and was a coaling vessel. She disapeared without a trace in March 1918. Ahrens is wearing a blue navy jumper and blue cap.
Albert George Ahrens was born in Oshkosh, WI on March 29, 1894, the son of Friederich and Maria (Haimann) Ahrens. He enlisted in the US Navy in 1914 and was assigned to the Battleship USS Arkansas. He saw action with a naval landing party in Vera Cruz, Mexico on April 22, 1914 and was commended for bravery. He became qualified as a Gun Pointer and was transferred to the collier (coaling vessel) USS Cyclops in World War I. While en route from Brazil to the United States, the ship disappeared with her crew of 293, between March 4 and 13, 1918. Ahrens was officially listed as missing on April 14, 1918. He was declared dead on June 14, 1918 after no trace of his ship could be found.
The Cyclops, a collier, was launched 7 May 1910 by William Cramp and Sons, Philadelphia, Pa., and placed in service 7 November 1910, G. W. Worley, Master, Navy Auxiliary Service, in charge. Operating with the Naval Auxiliary Service, Atlantic Fleet, the collier voyaged in the Baltic during May to July 1911 to supply 2d Division ships. Returning to Norfolk, she operated on the east coast from Newport to the Caribbean servicing the fleet. During the troubled conditions in Mexico in 1914 and 1915, she coaled ships on patrol there and received the thanks of the State Department for cooperation in bringing refugees from Tampico to New Orleans. With American entry into World War I, Cyclops was commissioned 1 May l917, Lieutenant Commander G. W. Worley in command. She joined a convoy for St. Nazaire, France, in June 1917, returning to the east coast in July. Except for a voyage to Halifax, Nova Scotia, she served along the east coast until 9 January 1918 when she was assigned to Naval Overseas Transportation Service. She then sailed to Brazilian waters to fuel British ships in the south Atlantic, receiving the thanks of the State Department and Commander-in-Chief, Pacific. She put to sea from Rio de Janiero 16 February 1918 and after touching at Barbados on 3 and 4 March, was never heard from again. Her loss with all 306 crew and passengers, without a trace, is one of the sea's unsolved mysteries.
Object ID P1937.2.8
Object Name Print, Photographic
People Ahrens, Albert George
Print size 3.5" x 5.5"
Subjects Portrait photographs
Male
Sailors
World War I
United States Navy
Ships
Shipwrecks
Title Navy collier, Cyclops
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Last modified on: December 12, 2009