WORLD WAR I
Letter

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Record 180/678
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Admin/Biog History Clarence S. Priebe was born in Oshkosh, WI on July 29, 1897, the son of Fred and Ida (Springborn) Priebe. He attended Dale School and graduated from Oshkosh High School in 1915. He worked for Medberry-Findeissen Company as a shipping clerk. He enlisted as a Wagoner in the Supply Company, 2nd Wisconsin National Guard on May 1st, 1917. He was listed as single, brown eyes, darl hair, fair complexion and five feet 11 3/4 inches tall. His unit became the Supply Company, 127th Infantry, 32nd Division. He served in France and was hospitalized in October 1918 where he died of blood poisoning on November 19, 1918. He was originally buried in a cemetery in France, but his body was returned to America and he was buried in Oshkosh at Riverside Cemetery, Lot 8, W 1/2B, H41, in July 1921.
Classification Archives
Collection World War I Small Collections
Dates of Accumulation 1917
Abstract Letter from Wagoner Clarence S. Priebe, Supply Company, 127th Infantry, 32nd Division, to his mother.

France
Mon P.M. Aug. 26, 1918

My dear Mother!
Well mother dear it's a day or so more than a week since I've written, so as having a bit of spare time today I thought I must answer your most welcome letter of July 26, which I received the other day. You see Mother I would have written before, but as usual we have been real busy and besides we couldn't find time to write. It seems on Sundays we are always busy when I want to write. You'd certainly be surprised dear if I could tell you how yesterday was spent. If you could only see us mother dear at work or fighting moods over here you'd certainly be surprised. But mother, don't worry as all is O.K. and I'm writing as often as usual. I never felt better in my life believe me and I guess the army eats, and out door sleeping is good for me. This outdoor stuff is certainly great. Last evening I slept under my wagon with grain or straw for a mattress and was covered up real snug and slept fine. My horses woke me up this A.M. as they were eating up the grain around my feet. See mother dear I have one horse I make a regular pet of and believe me he's a dandy. When I got him he was so skinny and nobody wanted him. Now he's real plump as I take good care of him and give him extra eats. Believe me he's a wise horse to and you should see what a pet I've made of him. I call him "Shanks". He's right near me now tied to my wagon and looking for oats. He's certainly a cute rascal a dark colored "Sorrel". Tell dad he should see him, as he's certainly a dandy. You see mother I drive two horses and haul rations for one of the line companies. So you see dear I have reasons for getting fat. Believe me I really am and you won't know me when I get back.

Well mother dear I'm getting most all of your mail I guess with the exception of one this month, figuring them a week apart. I can't understand dear why both you and Grace don't receive all my mail as I write at least once a week something must be wrong. I don't receive all of Grace's letter by a long ways either but here's hoping I soon will & both of you in turn will receive all my letters. She sent me a nice long letter the other day containing two of her latest snapshot pictures and I must write to her to one of these days. She certainly writes some dandy letters and don't worry or blame me when my letters fail to arrive.
.
Well mother dear everything is fine over here. We had a couple of good showers today but now the sun is out and fine and dandy. We were paid this A.M. & so I'm well supplied with money. Was glad to hear mother dear my allotments are arriving home all O.K. Kindly pay my insurance dear out of one will you? Now mother should you need any money use mine if need be and don't be bashful now as I always stated. Now will you mother?

I don't know if Grace received the money order I sent her through the YMCA or not but here's hoping she did. I did that mother dear to encourage her, as she was lonesome, don't you think that was all right mother dear? I expect a letter any day now stating if she received the money order as I sent it on July 14, 1918.


So coal is scarce in Oshkosh. Well dear that's tough. Wish you had about 100 cords of this hard wood to burn from over here, which we have a great plenty of. Here's hoping mother dear you will soon be supplied with something for winter.

So Aunt Annie is better, well I'm glad of that. I must write her a letter even though a small one to cheer her up one of these days.

Well mother my birthday came and went and I wish dear you could have seen how and where it was spent. It was the greatest experience in my life and I'll never forget my birthday when being 22 years old. I could tell you all about it, but anyway mother dear it was the real thing that day and at a noted place. Does the war news from over here seem as welcome as ever? Its certainly the real thing over here and it's a matter of time until I can come home and once more enjoy good old times. Now mother don't think I'm discouraged or anything but it's just a feeling of happiness for all of us when we can return with victory to the good old U.S.A. Miss. Morgan wrote me a nice long letter to which I must answer. Hope mother dear you are all well at home and in the best of spirits as much as the way this letter leaves me.

Now mother dear; give dad my best regards and also Ruth. Tell her I'll surely write one of these days as I certainly owe her a letter but don't always have time to write. I have those latest snapshots of you all in my souvenir case so all is O.K. Sis must certainly be some big girl by now and I wish I could see her.

Ed. Hayes is always near and sends his best regards mother dear to both you and Grace. At present he is by his one horse making a pet of him. I always tease him and call his horse a cripple and tell him to get a good one like "Shanks" (my own horse). The other one I call "Lady".

Well mother dear I'll close for this time with heaps of love and Prunes to you all and hope this letter finds you all well and in the best of spirits. "Cheer up" mother dear and write often (send some pictures if possible) I'll close now and remain.
As Ever
Your loving Son
Clarence Priebe
OK
R. Stull
2nt. Lt. 127 Inf.
Event World War I
Category 8: Communication Artifact
Legal Status Oshkosh Public Museum
Object ID SC411.10.31.3
Object Name Letter
People Priebe, Clarence Sidney
Subjects World War I
Soldiers
Casualties
127th United States Infantry
32nd Division
Teamsters
Wagons
Title Letter
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Last modified on: December 12, 2009