THE CIVIL WAR
Letter of from George Emmett Crandall to his mother Mary Crandall

Previous Next Civil War Exhibit Page Home Search
Record 150/294
Copyright Oshkosh Public Museum
Image
Enlarge Image
Image
Enlarge Image
Admin/Biog History CRANDALL, George Emmett - Pvt., Company K, 11th Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
George was born circa 1840 at Greenfield, New York. He was a son of Mary Crandall and a brother of Asahel from a previous sketch. George listed his residence as Winneconne, Winnebago County when he enlisted at Neenah, Winnebago County on Sept. 28, 1861 and was assigned as above. Standing over 5'7" tall, he had blue eyes, sandy hair and a sandy complexion. He re-enlisted with the same company at the end of his term on Feb. 13, 1864 at Indianola, Texas. George was wounded severely in the leg at Fort Blakely, Alabama in April 1865 and was then discharged on Oct. 17, 1865 due to a disability. He was married in Winnebago County on Jan. 7, 1867 to Sarah Doughty. George was buried with a simple military marker in the town of Winneconne at Bell Cemetery. Sarah, his widow, was married second in Winnebago County on Oct. 24, 1875 to Nicholas Becker.
Classification Archives
Collection Civil War Small Collections
Dates of Accumulation August 1, 1863?
Abstract 1 letter with patriotic envelope from George Emit Crandall, Company K, 11th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry to his mother Mary Crandall.

August 1, [1863?]

Dear mother,

I take my pen in hand to let you now that I am well and I hope this will find you the same. It is Sunday today and it is very hot here and very sickly here, but I stand it very well. I can't think of any thing to write, but I thought that I must write it. It is so lonesome here. Mother, what will the boys think if they all have to be drafted and they will. Mother, tell Hiram to come here and find our company and he will have better times than he would if he waited if he was drafted. Tell him that he can go to Neenah and come with our lieutenant. House, that is his name. If he comes, write and let me know. It is only about four days to come here.
But I am adjusted as you are and don't never mind the firing of guns. I know that it don't sound very good to hear the balls whistle around your head. It will make a man think of home once in awhile. I have, more than once.

Write soon and [I] will do the same. So goodbye. This is from Emit Crandell to his mother.
Event Civil War
Category 8: Communication Artifact
Legal Status Oshkosh Public Museum
Notes CRANDALL, George Emmett - Pvt., Company K, 11th Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
George was born circa 1840 at Greenfield, New York. He was a son of Mary Crandall and a brother of Asahel from a previous sketch. George listed his residence as Winneconne, Winnebago County when he enlisted at Neenah, Winnebago County on Sept. 28, 1861 and was assigned as above. Standing over 5'7" tall, he had blue eyes, sandy hair and a sandy complexion. He re-enlisted with the same company at the end of his term on Feb. 13, 1864 at Indianola, Texas. George was wounded severely in the leg at Fort Blakely, Alabama in April 1865 and was then discharged on Oct. 17, 1865 due to a disability. He was married in Winnebago County on Jan. 7, 1867 to Sarah Doughty. George was buried with a simple military marker in the town of Winneconne at Bell Cemetery. Sarah, his widow, was married second in Winnebago County on Oct. 24, 1875 to Nicholas Becker.
Object ID SC411.5.37.1
Object Name Letter
People Crandall, George Emmett
Crandall, Mary
Subjects Civil War
Soldiers
11th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Campaigns & battles
Bullets
Homesickness
Patriotic envelopes
Title Letter of from George Emmett Crandall to his mother Mary Crandall
COPYRIGHT INFORMATION ~ For access to this image, contact scross@ci.oshkosh.wi.us

NOTICE: This material may be freely used by non-commercial entities for educational and/or research purposes as long as this message remains on all copied material. These electronic pages cannot be reproduced in any format for profit or other presentation without the permission of The Oshkosh Public Museum. 2005 Oshkosh Public Museum, All Rights Reserved   
Last modified on: December 12, 2009