THE CIVIL WAR
Letters from Andrew Grignon to Louis B. Porlier

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Admin/Biog History GRIGNON, Andrew - Pvt., Company B, 21st Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Andrew was born on Feb. 7, 1825 at Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. He was a son of Robert Grignon and an unidentified Menominee woman. His father established a trading post on Lake Butte des Morts in the 1820s and also owned land in the Town of Algoma. Robert is credited with naming the City of Oshkosh in honor of the Menominee Chief. Andrew was married at Oshkosh, Winnebago County on May 6, 1849 to Charlotte Ellen Grignon. She was born circa 1832 at Wisconsin. They had a family of seven children: Marshall, subject of a following sketch; Susan, born circa 1849, married to Thomas Revoir of Winneconne, Winnebago County; Antoine, born circa 1851, married Lida Fuller; Mary Madeline, born circa 1851, resided at Oshkosh; Matilda Jane, born circa 1854, resided at Oshkosh; Louis, born circa 1857, resided at Winneconne; and Amelia, resided at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Andrew was living in the Town of Winneconne with his family in 1850 and was then engaged in farming. He was listed in the 1860 federal census as a farmer residing in the town of Winneconne with his family. Andrew enlisted at Winneconne on Aug. 15, 1862 and was assigned as above. He was taken prisoner at Jefferson, Tennessee on Dec. 30, 1862 and was paroled the following day. Andrew was sent to Nashville, then to Louisville and to Camp Chase at Columbus, Ohio. He was reported as missing from his unit in Jan. 1863. In Apr. 1863 he was sent to St. Louis. In the following month he was ordered back to his regiment after being formally exchanged. He re-joined his company at Murfreesboro, Tennessee in time to participate in the advance at Chickamauga, Georgia. Andrew was taken prisoner there on Sept. 20, 1863. The group with which he was captured was taken to Macon, Georgia and stripped of everything of value. They were then taken to Belle Isle Prison at Richmond, Virginia, reaching there in October. He was next taken to a building near Libby Prison. In December he was transferred to Danville Prison. While in transport, Andrew was struck on the forehead by a rebel officer. In April 1864 he was taken back to Georgia and held at Andersonville Prison. Andrew contracted scurvy and three times was given up for dead. He was taken to the primitive hospital and remained there until the end of November. He was just recovered enough to walk when he was siezed by fistula. After a month the swelling broke and he began to recover. Soon after, in the company of a soldier from Illinois, Andrew escaped from Andersonville. After about three weeks they were recaptured. He was held then at Macon until Feb. 1865 when he was returned to Andersonville. He remained confined there until Apr. 14, 1865 when released due to the end of the war. Andrew made his way back to Madison, Wisconsin and was mustered out on May 30, 1865. After his discharge he returned to Winneconne, where he owned a farm two miles from the village. He was listed in the veteran section of the 1885 and 1895 Wisconsin State census at P.O. Winneconne. Andrew was listed in the 1890 federal census as residing in the town of Winneconne at P.O. Winneconne. Andrew died at his farm on September 19, 1904.
Classification Archives
Collection Civil War Small Collections
Dates of Accumulation October 14, 1862
Abstract 1 letter and 1 envelope from Andrew Grignon to Louis B. Porlier during his service with Company B, 21st Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. The letter is written in French and has not been translated.
Event Civil War
Category 8: Communication Artifact
Language French
Legal Status Oshkosh Public Museum
Notes GRIGNON, Andrew - Pvt., Company B, 21st Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Andrew was born on Feb. 7, 1825 at Green Bay, Brown County, Wisconsin. He was a son of Amat and Madeline Grignon. Amat, a native of England, came to America at an early age. Madeline died at Green Bay in 1833 and Amat was then married to Judic Boroseau. He removed to Wisconsin during the time of turmoil with the Winnebago Indians and was engaged in that contest for a short time. He and Judic had six children. Son John is the subject of a following sketch. Son Enos also serv-ed in a Wisconsin Regiment. Andrew was married at Oshkosh, Winnebago County on May 6, 1849 to Charlotte Ellen Grignon. She was born circa 1832 at Wisconsin. They had a family of seven children: Marshall, subject of a following sketch; Susan, born circa 1849, married to Thomas Revoir of Winneconne, Winnebago County; Antoine, born circa 1851, married Lida Fuller; Mary Madeline, born circa 1851, resided at Oshkosh; Matilda Jane, born circa 1854, resided at Oshkosh; Louis, born circa 1857, resided at Winneconne; and Amelia, resided at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Andrew removed to the Winneconne area with his family in 1850 and was then engaged in farming. He was listed in the 1860 federal census as a farmer residing in the town of Winneconne with his family. Andrew enlisted at Winneconne on Aug. 15, 1862 and was assigned as above. He was taken prisoner at Jefferson, Tennessee on Dec. 30, 1862 and was paroled the following day. Andrew was sent to Nashville, then to Louisville and to Camp Chase at Columbus, Ohio. He was reported as missing from his unit in Jan. 1863. In Apr. 1863 he was sent to St. Louis. In the following month he was ordered back to his regiment after being formally exchang-ed. He rejoined his company at Murfreesboro, Tennessee in time to participate in the advance at Chickamauga, Georgia. Andrew was taken prisoner there on Sept. 20, 1863. The group with which he was captured was taken to Macon, Georgia and stripped of everything of value. They were then taken to Belle Isle Prison at Richmond, Virginia, reaching there in October. He was next taken to a building near Libby Prison. In December he was transferred to Danville Prison. While in transport, Andrew was struck on the forehead by a rebel officer. In April 1864 he was taken back to Georgia and held at Andersonville Prison. Andrew contracted scurvy and three times was given up for dead. He was taken to the primitive hospital and remained there until the end of November. He was just recovered enough to walk when he was siezed by fistula. After a month the swelling broke and he began to recover. Soon after, in the company of a soldier from Illinois, Andrew escaped from Andersonville. After about three weeks they were recaptured. He was held then at Macon until Feb. 1865 when he was returned to Andersonville. He remained confined there until Apr. 14, 1865 when released due to the end of the war. And-rew made his way back to Madison, Wisconsin and was mustered out on May 30, 1865. After his discharge he returned to Winneconne, where he owned a farm two miles from the village. He was listed in the veteran section of the 1885 and 1895 Wisconsin State census at P.O. Winneconne. Andrew was listed in the 1890 federal census as residing in the town of Winneconne at P.O. Winneconne. He was not found in the veteran section of the 1905 state census.
Object ID SC411.5.10
Object Name Letter
People Grignon, Andrew
Subjects Civil War
21st Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Prisoners of war
Libby Prison
Title Letters from Andrew Grignon to Louis B. Porlier
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