THE CIVIL WAR
Letter from William P. Taylor to Osman Taplin's mother.

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Admin/Biog History TAPLIN, Osman B. - Pvt., Company E, 2nd Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Osman was born circa 1840 at Vermont. He resided at Oshkosh, Winnebago County when he enlisted there on Apr. 21, 1861. An unmarried lumberman, he stood over 5'8" tall with blue eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion. He was assigned as above and was wounded severely in the side at Antietam, Maryland on Sept. 17, 1862. Osman died of his wounds on Sept. 24, 1862.
Jane S. Taplin was the wife of Lowell G. Taplin. They were born in Vermont and married there circa 1840. The couple had two children: Osman B., born circa 1841 and Carrie L., born circa 1843. In 1860 the family was living in Oshkosh in the 1st Ward. Lowell was working as a carpenter. Her son Osman died from wounds received during the Civil War. She died September 4, 1892 in Oshkosh.
William P. Taylor was born in 1831 at Fredrickton, New Brunswick, Canada. He resided at Oshkosh, Winnebago County when he enlisted at Madison, Dane County on May 18, 1861 in Company E, 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. An unmarried joiner, William stood just over 5'6" tall with gray eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion. He was assigned as a fifer in the above company and was taken prisoner in the first battle at Bull Run, Virginia. He served in the office of the Wisconsin Soldier's Aid Society in Washington for the rest of his enlistment. William was mustered out on June 28, 1864 at the end of his term of enlistment. During the great Oshkosh fire on July 14, 1874, while helping a widow remove a heavy chest from a second floor apartment before the flames reached there, he suddenly dropped the chest and sat down in great pain. He was eventually taken back to his room at the Adams House by a doctor, where he died that same evening. Although single, William left a great legacy in this area. He was generous to a fault and helped anyone who truly needed it whenever he could. As a large testament to his friendship, mourners numbering in the thousands attended the solemn procession. The citizens of Oshkosh provided a monument for his grave in Oshkosh at Riverside Cemetery, Block 11. His grave was decorated by the local GAR post in May 1882.
Classification Archives
Collection Civil War Small Collections
Dates of Accumulation November 5, 1863
Abstract Letter and envelope addressed to Jane S. Taplin from William P. Taylor Co. E, 2nd Wis Inf..

Washington D.C..
Nov. 5th, 1863
Mrs. J. S. Taplin
Respected Friend
Your letter of 28th Oct. I found in my box on my return from a visit of a week to the Army of the Potomac. I need not say I was much pleased to have such a good letter to read. It gives me much pleasure to not only read them myself, but to send them to my father, away in British America, who reads them with interest as they convince him that while wandering over the earth, I have the respect of good christian friends, whose influences may not be lost on me.
I regret that my time is so much taken up as to limit me to only a few minutes to pen you a short note. Mr Selleck, the States Agent, has for the last two weeks been on a visit to Wisconsin, and all business conected with the care of Wisconsin Soldiers has devolved upon me, and I have had to devote almost every hour of my time to it.
I am pleased to learn that the grave of poor Osman was untouched. I could not get to Antietam or Sharpsburg, as I anticipated, but as Betty Briant was there it has answered the purpose in a measure though it would aford my mournful pleasure to visit it again. Poor Osman!! The boys of the company, now numbering only 12, always mention him when we meetand talk over the past, around the little camp-fire. He was so much endeared to all. Since poor Osman left us we have had to part with others of our noble comrades: Lawson C. Ward, Cowardine, Sam F. Hackett, and Walker S. Rouse, four of just ass good as good and have noble hearted and true young men as can be found in this vast army. But, they are gone, gone forever from us, and with those who preeceded them from our company, they will all be present in our memory, "though dead they yet live." I thank you kindly for the invitation to spend the holidays with you, but am afraid I must decline as I think I cannot visit Oshkosh this winter. I saw Mrs. Raymond but once, shortly after her arrival in the city and have not found time to call on her since. I saw Mr. Gilbert, formerly of the firm Gilbert & McCoy - Oshkosh, tonight. He lives here. Please don't let this short note have the effect to produce a similar short one when you again write me. Send the paper please. I like it much. My respects to all.

Very truly yours,
Wm. P. Taylor
Event Civil War
Category 8: Communication Artifact
Legal Status Oshkosh Public Museum
Notes TAPLIN, Osman B. - Pvt., Company E, 2nd Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Osman was born circa 1840 at Vermont. He resided at Oshkosh, Winnebago County when he enlisted there on Apr. 21, 1861. An unmarried lumberman, he stood over 5'8" tall with blue eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion. He was assigned as above and was wounded severely in the side at Antietam, Maryland on Sept. 17, 1862. Osman died of his wounds on Sept. 24, 1862.
DAVIDS, John B. - Sgt., Company E, 2nd Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
John was born circa 1841 at Illinois. He was a son of Alexander from a previous sketch and a brother of William from a following sketch. John was a single farmer residing at Oshkosh, Winnebago County when he enlisted there on Apr. 21, 1861. Standing just over 6' tall, he had gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion. He was assigned as above and was promoted to Corporal and then Sergeant in that company on Dec. 16, 1862. John was taken prisoner at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on July 1, 1863. He was mustered out on Feb. 2, 1865 at Madison, Dane County, Wis-consin. John was listed in the 1899 article by Col. Harshaw as residing at Portland, Oregon.
TAYLOR, William P. - Pvt., Company E, 2nd Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
William was born in 1831 at Fredrickton, New Brunswick, Canada. He resided at Oshkosh, Winnebago County when he enlisted at Madison, Dane County on May 18, 1861. An unmarried joiner, William stood just over 5'6" tall with gray eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion. He was assigned as a fifer in the above company and was taken prisoner in the first battle at Bull Run, Virginia. He served in the office of the Wisconsin Soldier's Aid Society in Washington for the rest of his enlistment. William was mustered out on June 28, 1864 at the end of his term of enlistment. During the great Oshkosh fire on July 14, 1874, while helping a widow remove a heavy chest from a second floor apartment before the flames reached there, he suddenly dropped the chest and sat down in great pain. He was eventually taken back to his room at the Adams House by a doctor, where he died that same evening. Although single, William left a great legacy in this area. He was generous to a fault and helped anyone who truly needed it whenever he could. As a large testament to his friendship, mourners numbering in the thousands attended the solemn procession. The citizens of Oshkosh provided a monument for his grave in Oshkosh at Riverside Cemetery, Block 11. His grave was decorated by the local GAR post in May 1882.
Object ID SC411.5.17.10
Object Name Letter
People Taplin, Osman B.
Taylor, William P.
Taplin, Jane S.
Subjects Civil War
2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Iron Brigade
Battlefields
Death
Casualties
Military hospitals
Wisconsin Soldiers' Aid Society
Religion
Title Letter from William P. Taylor to Osman Taplin's mother.
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Last modified on: December 12, 2009