THE CIVIL WAR
Letter from William E. Strong

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Admin/Biog History Captain William E. Strong enlisted on April 24, 1861 in Racine. He left the regiment September 7, 1861 to accept a commission as Major of the 12th Wisconsin Infantry. He was appointed Assistant Inspector General on December 13, 1862, brevetted Colonel of United States Volunteers September 1, 1864, promoted to Lieutenant Colonel November 21, 1864, brevetted Brigadier General of U. S. Volunteers March 21, 1865 and mustered out of the service September 1, 1866. In 1882 he was president of the Peshtigo Company, manufacturers of lumber, lath and shingles.
Marion F. Humes enlisted in Company F, 2nd Wisconsin Infantry in Janesville, on May 10, 1861. He is considered to be the first Wisconsin soldier killed in battle.
Classification Archives
Collection Civil War Small Collections
Dates of Accumulation February 21, 1882
Abstract 1 letter on letterhead from William E. Strong to Mrs. J. H. Sturtevant concerning the death of her brother Marion F. Hume, considered the 1st soldier killed from Wisconsin in the Civil War:

Chicago, Ill.
February 2nd, 1882

Mrs. J. H. Sturtevant
Oshkosh
Wisconsin

Dear Madame;

Your favor of January 25th received, I am unable now to fix the exact date of the enlistment of Marion F. Humes. I think. However, he joined the Belle Light Rifles (afterwards "F" Company 2nd Wisconsin) of which I was Captain, in April 1861. I remember him well. He was a splendid soldier and the first one hit in "F" Company. The regiment was advancing in line of battle towards batteries in position July 21st (the first battle of Bull Run) when a round shot from a 6 pound field piece struck in front of the Command. [It] ricocheted, and passed through "F" Company, shattering the gun of the man in the front rank, one Flint I think. And carrying away the right arm of Marion F. Humes above the elbow. The line halted within a short distance and I ran back to Humes who was standing, but weak and faint. He said. However, he was able to walk back to the field hospital, which was in our rear, not far away. I directed him to do so and have always thought he reached the hospital but of course cannot say positively. I never saw him after he turned back and suppose he died on the field or in the rebel prison at Richmond.
I will try and ascertain for you the exact date of his enlistment, although it will be a difficult thing I fear. I think I could swear that he enlisted in April, still it may have been in May. I will do anything I can to aid his father in securing the information he desires. Wisconsin lost no braver or better soldier during the war than Marion F. Humes. He was among the very first to give his life for his country.

Yours very truly

Wm. E. Strong
Event Civil War
Category 8: Communication Artifact
Legal Status Oshkosh Public Museum
Notes Captain William E. Strong enlisted on April 24, 1861 in Racine. He left the regiment September 7, 1861 to accept a commission as Major of the 12th Wisconsin Infantry. He was appointed Assistant Inspector General on December 13, 1862, brevetted Colonel of United States Volunteers September 1, 1864, promoted to Lieutenant Colonel November 21, 1864, brevetted Brigadier General of U. S. Volunteers March 21, 1865 and mustered out of the service September 1, 1866. In 1882 he was president of the Peshtigo Company, manufacturers of lumber, lath and shingles.
Marion F. Humes enlisted in Company F, 2nd Wisconsin Infantry in Janesville, on May 10, 1861. He is considered to be the first Wisconsin soldier killed in battle.
Object ID SC411.5.15
Object Name Letter
People Strong, William E.
Humes, Marion F.
Sturtevant, Susa Humes
Subjects Civil War
2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry
Iron Brigade
Battlefields
Death
Casualties
Artillery (Weaponry)
Cannon balls
Title Letter from William E. Strong
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Last modified on: December 12, 2009