SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT AND WOMEN'S HISTORY
Ticket for Lecture by Emmeline Pankhurst

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Admin/Biog History Sarah S. James was born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin circa 1862, the daughter of Ebenezer James, a pioneer lumberman, manufactuer, and merchant. She grew up in a household with five sisters and at least one brother at 98 High Street. Sarah graduated from the Oshkosh Normal School in 1882 and also graduated from the Teacher's College of Columbia University in New York City. By 1884 she was teaching in Oshkosh High School and would continue to until 1911 when she retired to devote her full attention to the suffrage movement. She helped organize and became the president of the Equal Suffrage League of Oshkosh. Her offices were located at Room "I" in the Cook's Block on the corner of Main and Algoma. She also held meetings in her home. Sarah was also the recording secretary for the Political Equality League of Wisconsin and served as an officer alongside with Rose Swart (Oshkosh Normal School) and Jessie Jack Hooper (wife of Oshkosh Attorney Ben Hooper). Sarah helped organize local events, speaking engagements, and letter campaigns. She went to the Republican National Convention in Chicago to picket in 1920 and Washington D.C. Sarah spent the rest of her life at her home on High street living with two other maiden sisters. In February 1939, she fell walking home from downtown and broke her hip. She died at mercy Hospital on February 14, 1939.

Emmeline Goulden Pankhurst (1858 - 1928)
Emmeline Pankhurst, c.1908 'Deeds not words' was the motto of the Women's Social and Political Union founded by Emmeline Pankhurst. It is a motto that could also serve well to sum up Pankhurst's life, both as a woman and as a suffragette. She worked her entire life for the cause of women's suffrage, and was certainly not afraid to back up her words with action.
In 1879 she married Richard Pankhurst, who was a Manchester lawyer and a radical. He was the author of the first women's suffrage bill in Britain, as well as the Married Women's Property Acts of 1870 and 1882, which allowed women to keep earnings or property acquired before and after marriage.
In 1889 Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women's Franchise League, which fought to allow married women to vote in local elections. In October 1903, together with her daughter Christabel, she helped found the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) - an organisation that gained much notoriety with their militant actions.
From 1906 onwards, Pankhurst would lead the WSPU against the Liberal Party, whom she felt were the main obstacles standing in the way of women's suffrage. From 1908 to 1909, she was arrested three times, once after calling on people to 'rush the House of Commons' for the suffrage cause.
WSPU members were frequently arrested over the next few years, sometimes in response to a spate of arson attacks orchestrated by Christabel Pankhurst. In 1912 Emmeline herself was arrested monthly, over a period of a year.
The series of incarcerations followed a regular pattern: Once in prison, Emmeline would go on a hunger strike, and she would eventually be released in order for her to regain her health. She would then be put back in jail, where she would again starve herself. This way of dealing with hunger strikers was named the Cat and Mouse Act.
This period of militancy was abruptly ended by the start of World War One, when Emmeline turned her skills to supporting the war effort. Post-war, she moved around, from the US to Bermuda to Canada.
Upon her return to Britain in 1926, she was hailed as a leader of the women's rights movement and asked to stand as Conservative candidate for an East London constituency. She would die before she could be elected, yet she lived long enough to see the Voting Rights for Men and Women Act passed, only weeks before her death.
Classification Archives
Collection Sarah James
Dates of Accumulation 1911
Abstract Eleven Tickets for admission to the Grand Opera House on November 6, 1911 to hear a lecture by Mrs. Pankhurst, "The Famous English Suffragette" at 8:15 P. M. on November 6, 1911, by arrangement of the Equal Suffrage League of Oshkosh.
Category 8: Communication Artifact
Notes Emmeline Goulden Pankhurst (1858 - 1928)
Emmeline Pankhurst, c.1908 'Deeds not words' was the motto of the Women's Social and Political Union founded by Emmeline Pankhurst. It is a motto that could also serve well to sum up Pankhurst's life, both as a woman and as a suffragette. She worked her entire life for the cause of women's suffrage, and was certainly not afraid to back up her words with action.
In 1879 she married Richard Pankhurst, who was a Manchester lawyer and a radical. He was the author of the first women's suffrage bill in Britain, as well as the Married Women's Property Acts of 1870 and 1882, which allowed women to keep earnings or property acquired before and after marriage.
In 1889 Emmeline Pankhurst founded the Women's Franchise League, which fought to allow married women to vote in local elections. In October 1903, together with her daughter Christabel, she helped found the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) - an organisation that gained much notoriety with their militant actions.
From 1906 onwards, Pankhurst would lead the WSPU against the Liberal Party, whom she felt were the main obstacles standing in the way of women's suffrage. From 1908 to 1909, she was arrested three times, once after calling on people to 'rush the House of Commons' for the suffrage cause.
WSPU members were frequently arrested over the next few years, sometimes in response to a spate of arson attacks orchestrated by Christabel Pankhurst. In 1912 Emmeline herself was arrested monthly, over a period of a year.
The series of incarcerations followed a regular pattern: Once in prison, Emmeline would go on a hunger strike, and she would eventually be released in order for her to regain her health. She would then be put back in jail, where she would again starve herself. This way of dealing with hunger strikers was named the Cat and Mouse Act.
This period of militancy was abruptly ended by the start of World War One, when Emmeline turned her skills to supporting the war effort. Post-war, she moved around, from the US to Bermuda to Canada.
Upon her return to Britain in 1926, she was hailed as a leader of the women's rights movement and asked to stand as Conservative candidate for an East London constituency. She would die before she could be elected, yet she lived long enough to see the Voting Rights for Men and Women Act passed, only weeks before her death.
Object ID RG11.21
Object Name Ticket
People James, Sarah
Pankhurst, Emmiline Goulden
Subjects Suffrage
Suffragists
Oshkosh Equal Suffrage League
Grand Opera House
Title Ticket for Lecture by Emmeline Pankhurst
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