People of the Waters - Oneota
OPM #:
2111-231
Object Name:
Awl
Comments:
Animal bone, especially from larger mammals like deer, elk, and moose, was a wonderful material for making tools. It is extremely hard when dry, and it was easy to shape. Native people had many uses for bone: as digging tools; as decorative ornamentation; for projectile points; and as awls for sewing. Bone of many types was plentiful around villages. It could be easily and quickly shaped by grinding on stone, and when it was worn could be quickly replaced.

This tool, made from a deer leg bone, is an awl. It was an essential tool for Native people. Awls were used to punch holes in leather, fur, and birch bark prior to sewing or lacing.
Site Name:
Lasley's Point
Site#:
47-WN-96
Found:
Winnebago County, WI
Material:
Bone
Culture/Period:
Oneota
Woodland
Dimensions:
W-2.54 L-10.16 D-1.27 cm
Click to Enlarge
Amy Maile Photography Copyright 2017Amy Maile Photography Copyright 2017
Image 
Image 
On exhibit in W&WOn exhibit in W&W