People of the Waters - Paleoindian
OPM #:
M40
Object Name:
Projectile Point
Description:
Wittry 1-O; McCreary copper point, Paleoindian Agate Basin lithic point in copper. The earliest copper artifacts were based upon stone prototypes.
Comments:
Some of the earliest known metal working in the world took place in Wisconsin. This point was found in Green Lake County, Wisconsin.

Copper tools date back 8,000 years, maybe earlier. Some archaeologists believe Paleoindians might have used copper because a number of copper points look similar to their stone points. Microscopic analysis shows that copper points were flattened and shaped by heating, with the metal folded onto itself many times. Native people did not melt and cast copper.

How sharp and effective were copper points? Experiments show that a keen edge is possible. Although copper is soft by nature, it can be work-hardened by pounding. It could be sharpened by grinding on stone. The effectiveness of copper points for hunting has not been determined.
Found:
Green Lake County, WI/Princeton Township, WI
Collector:
Mueller, Frank
Material:
Metal
Culture/Period:
Paleoindian, Late
Dimensions:
W-2.45 L-11.2 D-0.35 cm
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Amy Maile Photography Copyright 2017Amy Maile Photography Copyright 2017
With stone Agate Basin point 800-14-T7With stone Agate Basin point 800-14-T7
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